Make a Racket with your Racquet!

Are you tired of your racquet looking like everyone else’s? Do you want to add a little style to your racquet to set it apart from the competition? Here are a few simple ways to add your own touch to a racquet.

Gamma String Things and Wilson VibraFun Dampeners

An easy and cheap way to add a little something-something to your racquet is a vibration dampener. If you want something a little more personalized than the generic brand logo, try out Gamma’s String Things. Each two-pack contains fun characters such as fish, pandas, and frogs as well as flowers and smiley faces. Wilson VibraFun dampeners come in packs of two and have even more designs such as a clover/broken heart combo, glitter hearts, multicolored flames, and a yin yang/peace sign combo. My personal favorite is the broken heart dampener. I show no mercy on the court, and my racquet agrees! Not only are these dampeners fun, but they also are useful for reducing string vibration.

Gamma Hand Print, Prince MicroSplat, and Forten Wrap-Tac

If you are tired of the same old black or white overgrips and want to add a little color to your racquet, check out some of the over grips from Gamma, Prince and Forten. Gamma Hand Print Overgrips come in a variety of fun patterns to spice up your racquet. You can choose from four different colors of camouflage, including blue, grey, orange and pink. In addition, there is a fun flower print in two colors of red and blue and a checkered flag pattern. If are interested in a more subdued pattern, check out Prince’s MicroSplat Overgrip that comes in a three pack with a variety of swirled colors. If you are not interested in patterns, check out the Forten Wrap-Tac O-Grip 60 pack that comes in eight assorted colors so you can match your grip to your racquet.

Rainbow of Strings

Think strings come in only neutral colors? Think again! Actually, there is a string for every color of the rainbow.  Check out the Tennis Warehouse tennis string page to find a variety of strings in every color and type. Can you make your own rainbow of string colors? Here is mine:

Red- Kirshbaum Pro Line II 16

Orange- Gamma Zo Tour 16

Yellow- Dunlop Synthetic S-Gut 17

Pink- Prince Lightning XX 16

Green- Prince Beast XP 17

Blue- Luxilon Big Banger ALU Power 16L

Purple- Weiss Canon 6 Star 16 (1.3)

Tourna Stencil Ink

Another easy and fun way to customize your racquet is with stencil ink. Tourna Racquet Logo Stencil Ink is the perfect solution to add a personal message or design to your racquet. Whether you add your initials, team logo, smiley face or lightening bolt, the stencil ink can add a quick special touch in red, blue, black or white. You can use it, too, as a fun way to unite a team to put the same message on all the players’ racquets.

Try one or all four of these ideas for a look that is completely your own!  Have fun with it!

Ad Out,

Brittany

Gamma Zo Magic 16 String Review

The Gamma Zo Magic 16 gauge string is advertised to be a very soft co-poly with very good tension maintenance. Sounds like a good combination to me…and so I gave it a try!

I strung up the Gamma Zo Magic 16 in a Prince TT Warrior MP at my standard 56 lbs for a polyester string. The string was very soft and stretchy for a polyester, and thus it was a little easier to string than most polys.

My first impression of the string was that it was extremely soft, almost “gummy” feeling. Since it was so soft it was very arm-friendly for a polyester, and thus very comfortable to play with. It also provided me with a lot of touch and feel on my shots, which is not always typical of a polyester.

With that said, the Zo Magic did not feel great hitting off the ground. Since the string was so soft and gummy, it did not pocket the ball well and did not have very much “pop” or spin potential. I felt that my groundstrokes floated off the racket a little too much and did not have the heaviness that my shots would normally have.

On serves and volleys, the softness and feel of the string gave me lots of control, especially on touch volleys. However, I was not able to generate very much spin or power on my volleys and serves. This was the general dislike I had for the string.

The string’s tension maintenance was excellent. I played with it for a few days, and then went on a two week long trip. Upon return, the tension had dropped slightly but was very similar to its original tension, which is pretty impressive for a polyester.

With that said though, I did not particularly enjoy playing with the Gamma Zo Magic. It was very arm-friendly, but did not provide me with enough power or spin for my liking. If you have the desire to play with one of the Gamma polyesters, I would suggest instead trying the Zo Power, which is soft and has a little more pop than the Zo Magic.

AG

String Review: Polyfibre TCS 16

After hearing rave reviews about it, I gave the Polyfibre TCS 16 gauge a try. It comes very highly praised from a number of TW playtesters as well as a number of ATP and WTA players. Advertised as being one of the softest and best feeling co-polys around, I looked forward to playing with it.

Stringing with the TCS was pretty much standard for a polyester string; stiff with not a whole lot of stretch. I strung my racquet at 56 lbs, and it was a somewhat difficult string, about on par with many of the other polyester strings on the market.

With the first strike of the ball I noticed the softness and the excellent bite the TCS had. For a co-poly, the softness made it very reasonable on the arm, and did not cause much discomfort. The softness of the TCS also provided me with lots of touch and feel, giving me a lot of control and command with all my shots.

What I liked most on the groundstrokes was the amount of spin I was able to generate off both the forehand and the backhand, as well as the backhand slice. Topspin shots were heavy and jumping off the court, and the slice had excellent bite and stayed low to the ground.

When volleying and serving, I had excellent control and bite with the TCS. Because the string was so soft, along with its excellent ball pocketing, I could control the ball really well and generate good control. The string is not too “explosive” and does not have a lot of “pop” like a Luxilon Big Banger ALU Power does, but because of the softness and spin potential of the TCS it enabled to have lots of command over my volleys and serves.

There were only two things about the TCS that stood out to me that I did not particularly like. First, as mentioned before, the string did not have a lot of “pop”, and thus generating pace was a little more difficult than I would have liked. I prefer a little more “explosive” string. The second thing I did not like was the tension maintenance, as the string lost tension quite quickly. After about a week the string tension had dropped considerably and I needed to cut them out.

Aside from that, the TCS was a very nice string that I would recommend it to players that prefer a polyester string but have a history of arm problems. The extreme softness of this string makes it very arm-friendly for a polyester, and along with the ball pocketing it also provides the player with lots of control and spin

Andy.