The second round

Me serving against my second round opponent, Ashley Hewitt.

Me serving against my second round opponent, Ashley Hewitt.

Going into the match I kept thinking what a great opportunity this is. Looking back, I think this hurt me.

I started the match surprisingly tight even though I had no reason to be so. I was the clear underdog playing against Ashley Hewitt, a player currently ranked inside the top 500 in the world. However, for some reason I felt the pressure. It could’ve been because I knew that while one ATP point was great, another win and a couple more points would be ideal and an opportunity that I might theoretically not have for a few weeks, as you never know what can happen in the qualifying rounds. Negative much? My word, terrible.

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On the board

Reflecting after winning my first ATP point, 6-1 6-2.

Reflecting after winning my first ATP point, 6-1 6-2.

Tuesday I woke up early with one goal in mind – get my first ATP point! After spending the weekend going through the qualifying rounds I knew it would be a shame and a bit heartbreaking to lose in my first round main draw match and get no compensation for my efforts. However, I knew I had to get those kinds of thoughts out of my mind!

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Greetings from Israel

Israel has been quite an experience so far. I feel like I’ve been here for a week. I arrived early Thursday morning at the airport in Tel Aviv. Thankfully, shortly thereafter my bag appeared on the luggage carousel. Having grown up in Africa that’s always a welcome sight for me and a small victory in itself.

From there I caught a train to Herzliya, which took about 45 minutes with all the stops and the changing of trains. From what I saw along the trip I must admit I was a little nervous and apprehensive. Mile after mile of run down blocks of flats, really rough neighborhoods and a diverse, interesting array of characters on and around the train. Another thing that really struck me and made a huge impression was the number of “kids” on the train and sitting at the station in their military fatigues. I’ve heard a lot of stories about the Israeli Army and their policy of conscription. I believe it’s a compulsory 2 years for woman and 3 years for men, but I was shocked at the sheer volume. I saw hundreds of “men” and “women,” many of whom were no more than 18 years old. What was even more frightening was that an M16 rifle seems like a standard accessory for many of these youngsters. I would say that was the most eye opening experience for me so far. It definitely gave me some perspective and a deep sense of gratitude for the situation I am in right now.
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