5 Best Modern Player’s Tennis Racquets (Andy’s Picks)

 

Roger Federer has switched to a more modern-style player's frame that's more forgiving and easier to use.

Roger Federer has switched to a more modern-style player’s frame that’s more forgiving and easier to use.

Roger Federer‘s new prototype racquet is a perfect example of how the MODERN PLAYER’S FRAME is becoming more and more popular in the game of tennis. He’s shed his traditional midsize Pro Staff for a more powerful and forgiving 98 square inch frame.

Modern player’s frames possess a slightly larger head size and a crisper, livelier response, similar to the more modern “‘tweener” frames like the Babolat AeroPro or Pure Drive.  At the same time, they retain the classic precision and feel of a more traditional-style racquet like the Wilson Six.One or Pro Staff. They are ideal for the intermediate to advanced player that appreciates the classic touch and feel but just wants something a little more forgiving in order to help keep up with the modern game.

Here are my 5 current favorites:

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How to Choose a Tennis Racquet: Racquet terms explained

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Picking out a new racquet for yourself or a loved one can be daunting. With 20 different brands and hundreds of different models, choosing the right racquet can make one’s head spin. Kind of like what happens to me when I walk into a perfume store or cereal aisle. At Tennis Warehouse, I think sometimes, we forget not everyone is as into tennis as we are. Our everyday tennis vernacular isn’t very everyday and common to most recreational players. So I want to break down racquet terminology in layman’s terms in hopes of clarifying what makes racquets play and perform the way they do so you can make a more informed decision before buying your next racquet. (From Tennis Warehouse I hope.)

Head size

Mid - Less than 95 square inches (example: Wilson Pro Staff 6.0 85)
Midplus - 95 to 104 square inches (example: Babolat Aero Pro Drive)
Oversize - 105+ square inches (example: Prince Premier 115L ESP)

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When we’re talking head size, we’re talking about the size of the racquet head (where the strings are). Obvious, I know. The larger the head size, the larger the sweetspot. Usually, a racquet’s headsize is in proportion to the level of player the racquet was designed for. Key word being “usually.” So racquets with an oversize head (105 sq in and bigger), tend to be meant for beginner players who need that bigger sweetspot and more power. They also tend to be more stable for those times the ball isn’t hit exactly in the sweetspot. And racquets that have mid size head’s are meant for the more advanced player.

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