The 7 Deadly Sins – Tips for playing doubles tennis

What are the 7 Deadly Sins? Well, they are the capital vices or, as some like to refer to them, the cardinal sins of life. And, due to my sole useful ability being that I am able to apply everything in this world to tennis, I’ve applied these on court, too. The following seven sins are doubles mistakes that challenge us on court with our partners.

Screen shot 2013-03-01 at 4.14.50 AM1. Lust – “Intense desire”

Lust signifies wanting the glory shot – the drop shot you shouldn’t go for, the blazing winner past the volleyer, or (my personal favorite) the down-the-line shot-when-you-really-should-have-hit-it-crosscourt-again. Yes, that shot (you know what I’m talking about) – that you want so badly, but you usually don’t make. To that I say, have some discipline. Sure, the feeling you’ll get when you make it is phenomenal (and you’ll look magnificent), but it’s better to wait for the right moment. Don’t go for the wild flaming winner because the percentages of you making it regularly are very low. Take your time, build your points and resist temptation. Do it when you’re actually supposed to. You don’t want to look good hitting a single awesome forehand once a set. You want to look good by winning.

If Venus is smart

Instead of going for too much, Venus gets the low volley back to join her sister in at net

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Cause and effect of tennis injuries: Injury culture

As far as tennis goes, we all know injuries come with the territory.

Sharapova had shoulder surgery. (Photo courtesy of Cynthia Lum)

Sharapova had shoulder surgery. (Photo courtesy of Cynthia Lum)

Tennis is a year-round sport. There is no “off season,” and high performance and athletic prowess are not only required for years upon years by the athletes themselves, but also demanded by their fans.

With my personal experience (which, granted has been worst than most) I find the culture surrounding injuries in modern tennis interesting. In a sport that puts the human body under extreme strain, injuries are prevalent, yet the response from the world is usually less than understanding. This is not always the case, but often: If you’re playing injured you’re criticized for mentioning it because it’s seen as creating an excuse for poor performance or loss. If you’re playing injured and don’t mention it, then have a bad performance because of that injury, you’re criticized for playing horrible tennis. If you’re not playing because you’re injured, it’s common to get criticized about whether you’re not being tough enough or why your recovery is taking so long.

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Success! Head players win tournaments in early 2013

If Head’s New Year’s Resolutions for 2013 were along the lines of “Immediately win two individual tournaments and a team tournament,” then the year as started out as a great success. With three Head players, Andy Murray, Richard Gasquet and Anabel Medina Garrigues, subsequently adding a title under their belts, the sponsored players of the sports company are doing remarkably well for so early in the year.

Andy Murray defending his title at the Brisbane International. Photo courtesy of HEAD Penn Racquet Sports.

Andy Murray defending his title at the Brisbane International. Photo courtesy of HEAD Penn Racquet Sports.

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