How string patterns affect spin

Spin is in with the new super open string patterns by Wilson

Spin is in with the new super open string patterns by Wilson

With the release of the new Wilson Spin Effect racquets, the Steam 99 S and Steam 105 S, people are talking about the way that spin is produced and what effects a racquet can have on spin production. Wilson utilizes an open 16×15 string pattern that it claims helps to produce noticeably more spin than a traditional 16×18 or 18×20 string pattern. The difference lies in there being fewer cross strings than main strings, thus opening up the stringbed and creating more space in between the strings.

Interestingly enough, our TW University professor, Crawford Lindsey, was onto something very similar a few years ago when he started testing the effects that different string patterns had on spin. He conducted experiments (outlined in his “Spin and String Pattern” article in September of 2010) to test which string patterns were more effective in producing more spin.

This picture simulates the stretching of the main strings at contact, which is what helps produce topspin.

This picture simulates the stretching of the main strings at contact, which is what helps produce topspin.

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Tennis tops to fit tall ladies

Standing at 5’11″, I find it a constant struggle to find tennis and workout apparel that is long enough to practice and train in but also comfortable, stylish and functional.  This week, I went in search at Tennis Warehouse for the best top options that we carry that are fashionable, comfortable and suited for the taller ladies.

Longer Tennis Tops

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Cause and effect of tennis injuries: Injury culture

As far as tennis goes, we all know injuries come with the territory.

Sharapova had shoulder surgery. (Photo courtesy of Cynthia Lum)

Sharapova had shoulder surgery. (Photo courtesy of Cynthia Lum)

Tennis is a year-round sport. There is no “off season,” and high performance and athletic prowess are not only required for years upon years by the athletes themselves, but also demanded by their fans.

With my personal experience (which, granted has been worst than most) I find the culture surrounding injuries in modern tennis interesting. In a sport that puts the human body under extreme strain, injuries are prevalent, yet the response from the world is usually less than understanding. This is not always the case, but often: If you’re playing injured you’re criticized for mentioning it because it’s seen as creating an excuse for poor performance or loss. If you’re playing injured and don’t mention it, then have a bad performance because of that injury, you’re criticized for playing horrible tennis. If you’re not playing because you’re injured, it’s common to get criticized about whether you’re not being tough enough or why your recovery is taking so long.

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